Community Resilience Planning

Article by Graeme Hazard 08 March 2018

Recent extreme weather conditions in parts of the UK have highlighted the importance of community spirit especially in our more rural areas. These communities may rely on people working together in such circumstances, as they can quickly become isolated from the wider community when roads are covered with snow, ice or floodwater.


Examples of this community spirit and the importance of community resilience could be found across the country last week, as the Beast from the east brought heavy snow, ice and high winds.


Appeals were put out on social media by doctors, nurses and community care workers to ask owners of four wheel drive vehicles to assist them in reaching those in need. Many answered the call and voluntarily gave up their time

There were reports of shop workers going out into the community to check on elderly customers in their homes, and taking food supplies so they didn’t have to venture out in the extreme and adverse weather

Communities posted messages on social media to inform friends and neighbours of the road and weather conditions, so that people were not going out and putting themselves at risk unnecessarily.

There were even requests put out for drones with cameras that were needed to try to find livestock that was missing in the snow.


Community Resilience Tweet Screenshot


Having a Community Resilience Plan in place for emergency situations such as extreme winter weather, flooding, power cuts or other wide scale emergencies can highlight:

  • Who may be vulnerable
  • Useful contacts details
  • Who can help
  • Any resources  which may be available in the community
  • Community skills, experience that could be useful if required in an emergency


Having a plan which brings the information and resources together could mean that the communal impacts of an emergency situation are lessened, and that help and assistance can be provided in the community and by the community where needed.


Below is a downloadable resource which can be used as a starting point for building your community plan and becoming a more resilient community.


Community Resilience Plans (1)



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